Personal Development

Why Mistakes are Good

by necoaching necoaching No Comments

James Joyce once wrote, “A man of genius makes no mistakes. His errors are volitional and are the portals of discovery”; he was speaking about William Shakespeare. Thomas Edison said, “I have not failed. I’ve just found 10,000 ways that won’t work”. What does all this mean? Are mistakes simply an essential part of how we develop, both personally and professionally? In fact, one could argue that most mistakes are positive! Mistakes try again

As human beings, despite our best intentions, we make “mistakes” all the time. As Peter Buffet in his book “Life Is What You Make Of It”, he points that we makes mistakes when impatient and indecisive, with foolish acts and foolish failures to act, when overly ambitious and not ambitious enough. There is no prescription for this and each situation is unique to every individual. Yes, we can learn from others, but you will never know exactly what works for you unless you try it.

Obviously, a certain amount of caution can be exercised, but doing nothing can also be considered a mistake; a Catch 22 if you will! This applies to every single aspect of your life whether it has to do with family, career, health, business, money, relationships, etc. So what might be some options to better manage these potential “mistakes”?

1. Do some analysis – assess the “pros and cons” to gain a deeper insight of what might be involved.
2. Speak to others – identify those you know, like or trust who might have some experience and are prepared to offer their advice.
3. Hire a coach – seek out an objective, professional confidante who will challenge, but also support you along the way.
4. Be courageous and just do it – maybe walk before your run and you can always adjust your setting along the way.

All of this revolves around being an proactive player in your life and being less concerned about the judgments of others. Perhaps there are no mistakes!

Life Lessons from Business Research

by necoaching necoaching No Comments

An edition of the Harvard Business Review ran with a front cover piece which claimed, “We have studied 25,453 companies over 40 years to find the 3 Rules for Success”. Through this extensive research the authors, Raynor and Ahmed, concluded the following for making a company great:

1. Better before Cheaper – compete on differentiators rather than price
2. Revenue before Cost – prioritize growing revenue over reducing costs
3. There are no rules – change everything to follow Rules 1 and 2

This was a little disappointing as one might be expecting some earth shattering revelation but instead it was really only two rules and even these might appear pretty pedestrian to most. Without question there are sub elements to these two points that would speak to more obvious business drivers such as technology, innovation, leadership, marketing, customer knowledge, etc but perhaps these speak to the fundamental psychology and simplicity of business success.

So if business success can be viewed in such basic terms, how might it translate in a similar way to personal success? Perhaps the three rules might look something like the following:

1. Always do your best with what you have – optimization of your unique abilities and qualities are your key differentiators
2. Invest in your personal growth and development – seek out ways in which you continuously enhance your intellectual, physical and mental well being.
3. Simply take care of the above and everything else will be fine.

Perhaps the purpose of research is to make things simpler and maybe even confirm what we already knew. But business can often be quite the metaphor for life so if there is something that we can garner from this type of research in personal terms then so much the better.

Similarities between Coaching and Investing

by necoaching necoaching No Comments

insuranceI was recently researching the benefits of having a Whole Life Insurance Policy. For the uninformed this is like a life insurance plus an investment portfolio all wrapped up in one. The beauty of whole life insurance is that there is a payment when you actually die; the more typical life insurance policies expire when you turn 65. This all sounds very morbid but there is a point as it relates to coaching that I would like to elaborate on.

Firstly, on a very practical level, coaching is an investment both in terms of time, effort and money. You need to commit resources on a consistent basis in order to get a return. There is also a relationship to how much you put in and yes, just as with your money, there are trade offs in terms of redirecting some of your priorities.

Secondly, there’s the risk. What might coaching uncover about who you are, your purpose, your destiny? What actions will you be willing to take in pursuit of what matters most to you? How might it impact your family, the people you work with, your career or your business? With actions there are always consequences.

Thirdly, there’s the control. Unlike a financial investment, you have more control over YOU than anybody else. Coaching helps to create this self awareness and confidence, and the proof is the countless stories of how people have overcome enormous adversity in pursuit of a dream. Where there’s a will, there’s a way.

And finally, there’s the return. With an investment portfolio, there are no guarantees but history would suggest that it you are in it for the long run, it will inevitably lead to a positive outcome. So it is with coaching, if you commit resources and are prepared to try new things, inevitably something positive will manifest.

Ironically the insurance policy alluded to above as “Whole Life” also pertains to coaching. Irrespective or what type you might receive, whether executive, career or wellness, there is no separation between personal and professional; they all intertwine. So in many respects what one is investing in is Whole Life Coaching.

There are no Mistakes

by necoaching necoaching No Comments

mistakesJames Joyce once wrote, “A man of genius makes no mistakes. His errors are volitional and are the portals of discovery”; he was speaking about William Shakespeare. Thomas Edison said, “I have not failed. I’ve just found 10,000 ways that won’t work”. What does all this mean? Are mistakes simply an essential part of how we develop, both personally and professionally? In fact, one could even say that most mistakes are positive!

As human beings, despite our best intentions, we make “mistakes” all the time. As Peter Buffet in his book Life Is What You Make Of It, he points that we makes mistakes when impatient and indecisive, with foolish acts and foolish failures to act, when overly ambitious and not ambitious enough. There is no prescription for this and each situation is unique to every individual. Yes we can learn from others but you will never know exactly what works for you unless you try it.

Obviously, a certain amount of caution can be exercised but doing nothing can also be considered a mistake; a Catch 22 if you will! This applies to every single aspect of your life whether it has to do with family, career, health, money, relationships, etc. So what might be some options to mange these “essential mistakes”?

  • Do some analysis – assess the “pros and cons” to gain a deeper insight of what might be involved
  • Speak to others – identify those you know, like or trust who might have some experience and are prepared to offer their advice
  • Hire a coach – seek out an objective, professional confidante who will challenge but also support you along the way
  • Be courageous and just do it – maybe walk before your run and you can always adjust your setting along the way.

All of this revolves around being an active player in your life and being less concerned about the judgments of others. Perhaps there are no mistakes!

New Year’s Wish List

by necoaching necoaching No Comments

listI was recently asked by my own coach, as we ponder a new year, to identify my 100 Desires; anything I would like to do, to be, to taste, to go, to have or to experience. Whatever came to mind was written down with little or no judgment. Interestingly the exercise turned out to be much more difficult than I thought it would be. The first 30 or so were easy but then it got steadily more difficult and by 45, I was done. I put it aside for a few days and came back to it and added another 5. The more I reflected on this exercise, the more I thought there was a catch or perhaps I was missing something.

So, in a creative moment of genius, I decided to view this exercise from the perspective of what would the people who I care most about say. I thought of my wife, my kids, friends, clients, work colleagues and before I knew it the ideas were flowing again. As I began to think in terms of what other people might ask of me, the exercise became quite liberating. I made it to 75.

While still challenged with how I might get up to that magical 100, I realized that in serving others I was very much in service of myself. Quite often people set goals that overlook the opportunity in helping or providing for others. As research from people like Shawn Aker will testify, true happiness is garnered from selfless acts of kindness. This latter piece of the exercise certainly got me more energized.

So as you reflect on what 2016 might hold in store for you, think about your Wish List, your desires. More importantly, be sure to consider what the stakeholders in your life might want of you; it may very well be what you want of yourself.

New Year’s Wish List

by necoaching necoaching No Comments

I was recently asked by my own coach, as we ponder a new year, to identify my 100 Desires; anything I would like to do, to be, to taste, to go, to have or to experience.  Whatever came to mind was written down with little or no judgment.  Interestingly the exercise turned out to be much more difficult than I thought it would be.  The first 30 or so were easy but then it got steadily more difficult and by 45, I was done.  I put it aside for a few days and came back to it and added another 5.  The more I reflected on this exercise, the more I thought there was a catch or perhaps I was missing something.

So, in a creative moment of genius, I decided to view this exercise from the perspective of what would the people who I care most about say.  I thought of my wife, my kids, friends, clients, work colleagues and before I knew it the ideas were flowing again.  As I began to think in terms of what other people might ask of me, the exercise became quite liberating.  I made it to 75.

While still challenged with how I might get up to that magical 100, I realized that in serving others I was very much in service of myself.  Quite often people set goals that overlook the opportunity in helping or providing for others.  As research from people like Shawn Aker will testify, true happiness is garnered from selfless acts of kindness.  This latter piece of the exercise certainly got me more energized.

So as you reflect on what 2014 might hold in store for you, think about your Wish List, your desires.  More importantly, be sure to consider what the stakeholders in your life might want of you; it may very well be what you want of yourself.

Coaching- An Investment in your Future

by necoaching necoaching No Comments

I was recently researching the benefits of having a Whole Life Insurance Policy.  For the uninformed this is like a life insurance plus an investment portfolio all wrapped up in one.  The beauty of whole life insurance is that there is a payment when you actually die; the more typical life insurance policies expire when you turn 65.  This all sounds very morbid but there is a point as it relates to coaching that I would like to elaborate on.

coaching investmentFirstly, on a very practical level, coaching is an investment both in terms of time, effort and money.  You need to commit resources on a consistent basis in order to get a return.  There is also a relationship to how much you put in and yes, just as with your money, there are trade offs in terms of redirecting some of your priorities.

Secondly, there’s the risk.  What might coaching uncover about who you are, your purpose, your destiny?  What actions will you be willing to take in pursuit of what matters most to you?  How might it impact your family, the people you work with, your career or your business?  With actions there are always consequences.

Thirdly, there’s the control.  Unlike a financial investment, you have more control over YOU than anybody else.  Coaching helps to create this self awareness and confidence, and the proof is the countless stories of how people have overcome enormous adversity in pursuit of a dream.  Where there’s a will, there’s a way.

And finally, there’s the return.  With an investment portfolio, there are no guarantees but history would suggest that it you are in it for the long run, it will inevitably lead to a positive outcome.  So it is with coaching, if you commit resources and are prepared to try new things, inevitably something positive will manifest.

Ironically the insurance policy alluded to above as “Whole Life” also pertains to coaching.  Irrespective or what type you might receive, whether executive, career or wellness, there is no separation between personal and professional; they all intertwine.   So in many respects what one is investing in is Whole Life Coaching.

Personal Success Tips from Business Research

by necoaching necoaching No Comments

A recent edition of the Harvard Business Review ran with a front cover piece which claimed, “We have studied 25,453 companies over 40 years to find the 3 Rules for Success”.  Through this extensive research the authors, Raynor and Ahmed, concluded the following for making a company great:

1. Better before Cheaper – compete on differentiators rather than price
2. Revenue before Cost – prioritize growing revenue over reducing costs
3. There are no rules – change anything to follow Rules 1 and 2

This was a little disappointing as one might be expecting some earth shattering revelation but instead it was really only two rules and even these might appear pretty pedestrian to most.  Without question there are sub elements to these two points that would speak to more obvious business drivers such as technology, innovation, leadership, marketing, customer knowledge, etc but perhaps these speak to the fundamental psychology and simplicity of business success. Read more

Essential Mistakes

by necoaching necoaching No Comments

James Joyce once wrote, “A man of genius makes no mistakes. His errors are volitional and are the portals of discovery”; he was speaking about William Shakespeare. Thomas Edison said, “I have not failed. I’ve just found 10,000 ways that won’t work”. What does all this mean? Are mistakes simply an essential part of how we develop, both personally and professionally. In fact, one could say that most mistakes are positive!

As human beings, despite our best intentions, we make “mistakes” all the time. As Peter Buffet in his book Life Is What You Make Of It, he points that we makes mistakes when impatient and indecisive, with foolish acts and foolish failures to act, when overly ambitious and not ambitious enough. There is no prescription for this and each situation is unique to every individual. Yes we can learn from others but you will never know exactly what works for you unless you try it. Read more