Genos

Emotional Intelligence and the Bachelor

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Ok, so I am going to make a radical admission – I have been watching this season’s Bachelor on TV and let’s just say it’s quality time spent with my wife. So, when to my pleasant surprise, I heard how Corinne was being accused of lacking in Emotional Intelligence (EI) by fellow competitor the bachelorTaylor, I thought some might be interested in truly understanding what this form of intelligence is really all about.

According to Genos International, Emotional Intelligence involves a set of skills that define how effectively you perceive, understand, reason with, and manage your own and others’ emotions. Some of the keys skills are:

1. Self Awareness

How you show up in terms of your emotions / behavior forms a huge part of how other people perceive (and feel about) you. The perception of you by others is their reality and first impressions can be lasting. You may not care and that’s ok. But if you do care, such as with family, friends and co-workers, then being tuned into your behavior and its effect on others, can serve you very well.

2. Awareness of Others

In parallel with the above, being equally mindful and sensitive to the emotions of other people can really help you connect with them. By listening better and being able to tap into their emotional cues, you can build a better rapport and be genuinely empathetic; consequently, people will be drawn to you.

3. Emotional Decision Making

Many might argue that we justify based on facts, but make decisions on emotions; think of buying a car. By taking the time to consider, not only the data/facts, but how those (including yourself) might be impacted emotionally by a decision you make, could ultimately lead to making better choices.

4. Self Management

This is the classic where something is upsetting, and do you react impulsively (typically followed by regret), or do you respond in a controlled manner and achieve the desired outcome? Taking time to consider (looking before you leap) is about taking control of the choices you make, in reasonable and responsible manner.

Emotionally intelligent behavior can be summed up as doing/saying the appropriate thing, with the appropriate person, at the appropriate time. In the case of Corrine and Taylor, this just never happened and consequently resulted in what was plain to be seen right up to the end; they couldn’t even look at each other. Everybody thought it was funny (and let’s not forget it was reality TV) but based on what we saw, who would want to spend time with either person?

Emotional Intelligent Selling

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Research conducted by Emotional Intelligent (EI) thought leaders Genos suggests that sales people who demonstrate emotionally intelligent behavior have an edge. In this study it was shown that a group of 40 sales people out performed a comparable controlled group by 12% following their developmental experience with EI (Jennings and Palmer, 2007). So how does a salesperson demonstrating emotionally intelligent behavior show up?

1. Self Awareness
How you show up and present yourself (look, demeanor, attitude, communication style, etc) to a client forms a huge part of how they perceive (and feel about) you. Know what this is as their perception of you is their reality and first impressions can be lasting.

2. Awareness of Others
Sincerely help the client get what they want to buy, rather than what you want to sell. Consequently, you will listen better, be more informed, and establish a better rapport and more likely close the deal; be genuinely empathetic.

3. Emotional Decision Making
We justify based on facts but make decisions on emotions. In most sales both are in play and often we over emphasize the facts and forget about the emotions. Take time to consider how those impacted by what you have to offer really feel about it and you might be surprised with the answer you get.

4. Self Management
Inevitably in sales you are going to meet with disappointment. Don’t let this show in front of potential clients. You can manage these emotions and maintain a positive disposition at all times; remain resilient.

Emotionally intelligent behavior can be summed up as doing the appropriate thing with the appropriate person at the appropriate time. In fact some would suggest that EI might be a better predictor of sales success than experience, knowledge or personality. This is not to say that these are not important but more that Emotional Intelligence should not be overlooked.

What is Self Awareness?

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If you were to ask most people what they thought self awareness is about you would most likely be greeted with a quizzical look.  Yet much has been written on this subject and many thought leaders would argue that it is at the heart of interpersonal and leadership effectiveness.  So what exactly is it?

Genos, known for their expertise in the area of Emotional Intelligence, offer the simple definition that “it’s the skill of perceiving and understanding one’s own emotions”.  In simple terms, this means there is a level of (self) consciousness that allows you to be “in tune” with your own moods, feelings, emotions and actions.

Self awareness is something that ultimately lies within; you have considerable control.  Unfortunately many of us go through life saying or doing things and behaving in certain ways without realizing the consequence in terms of relationships, careers and ultimately one’s ability to achieve success.  We tend to operate on auto pilot and we quite simply don’t “look before we leap”.

So what can be done about this?  There are two techniques through which one becomes more self aware.  One is to do more self reflection which can be as simple as taking some “quiet or thinking” time, practicing meditation and/or consistently (self) reviewing how things are going.  The other is to solicit feedback from others.  In a work environment this might be formally through a review or a 360 process.  But it could also just be as simple as asking somebody for feedback in terms of how you are doing or have conducted yourself.

The key to remember is that it all starts with you!  Others form perceptions based on how you show up in terms of your moods, feelings, emotions and actions.  The only way to change those perceptions (if you so choose) is to change you.  Self awareness, though not the end all, is certainly where it all starts.

Employee Engagement – Return on Investment

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Each year corporations spend millions of dollars on various forms of professional development and the seemingly never ending debate ensues in terms of, what is the return on investment? For a long time this has always been difficult to determine because the benefits are not obviously tangible and most often cannot be expressed in financial terms. I suppose it’s akin to putting people “our most important asset” on the balance sheet. Alas that hasn’t happened yet either.

So in the absence of any financial accounting mechanisms employee engagement surveys have emerged as an objective basis to assessing the human contribution. Given that engaged employees equate to reduced turnover, innovative contributions, improved efficiencies, etc, can one assume that if some form of professional development improves engagement scores then that supports a credible return on investment? Read more

Emotions & Selling

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Recent research conducted by Genos and Quantas Airlines suggests that sales people who demonstrate emotionally intelligent behavior have an edge. In this study it was shown that a group of 40 sales people out performed a comparable controlled group by 12% following their developmental experience with EI (Jennings and Palmer, 2007). So what does a salesperson do who demonstrates emotionally intelligent behavior?

The following is a sample of 4 skills and associated behaviors that can enhance any selling process.

1. Self Awareness

How you show up and present yourself (look, demeanor, attitude, communication style, etc) to a client forms a huge part of how they perceive (and feel about) you. Make it good because their perception of you is their reality. Be very mindful of how you come across. Read more

Coaching Model using Emotional Intelligence and Motivational Fit

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Coaching skills provide a tremendous framework for improved communication and also inspire and implement the action necessary to achieve a desired result. In an effective manager / report relationship what would it take to make this interaction even better? How about a manger who demonstrates emotionally intelligent behavior working with a report who is highly motivated? This surely feels like “Coaching Utopia” with all the ingredients present for a successful outcome.

Of course you might be thinking that this is not realistic and rarely would you have a situation in place when these variables are “in sync”. In fact it might even be suggested that should this be the case then there is no need for coaching. Don’t forget coaching is not about fixing something that is broke. It’s about making a good situation even better; moving from functional to optimal. Research completed by Genos PTY supports this fact that much higher levels of employee engagement can be achieved when both an emotionally intelligent manager and motivated employee are present in the respective individuals. In turn employee engagement manifests itself in low turnover, high productivity, innovation, improved relations, etc, which are most typically the outcomes been sought through coaching support and development. Read more

Motivation & Employee Engagement

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Through various research studies the inherent link between employee engagement and emotional intelligence has become quite accepted. However what is also emerging is that by placing the emphasis entirely on leadership demonstrating emotionally intelligent behavior in pursuit of the “engaged workforce”, an important element is being overlooked.

What about the “disengaged” employee? Are they influenced solely by how their manager behaves? Don’t they have their role to play in this as well? In addressing these questions it becomes apparent that the element that speaks to this missing link is Motivation.

According to Genos International, individual motivation factors exist in four different areas:

1. Role

This covers the day to day working elements of completing tasks essential to your job, contacting customers or vendors, challenging yourself, working within the rules and regulations, etc.

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Leadership – Mood Management of Others

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Have you ever been at a meeting where there might be some tension which is contributing to a less than productive interaction?  Somebody has said the wrong thing or done something that exception is taken to and, before you know it, the meeting is going down hill rapidly.

What in fact has happened is that a stimulus, whether a word or action, has caused a drain in energy for many in the room and they become emotionally disconnected.  This manifests itself in a mood shift where people are no longer listening, not wanting to contribute and certainly not receptive to taking action.

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Leadership – Self Management

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Why is it that the focus of Leadership primarily revolves around the relationship a leader has with others? One forgets that this whole process very much starts with the relationship you have with yourself. If this sounds a little bizarre, let me explain.

Do people sometimes regard you as unpredictable, unapproachable (depending on the day), not very receptive to bad news, sad, perhaps not even fun to be around? If the answer to any of these questions is yes, then you could be lacking in the Genos EI skill of Emotional Self Management. This skill pertains to how effectively you manage your own emotions and it manifests itself as your MOOD. The following strategies offer the opportunity of how you might cope more effectively with moods and dramatically improve your leadership style (and your overall wellbeing and happiness).

1. Thinking Strategies

How do you switch those negative thoughts into positive ones? Some examples of what people use for this might include meditation, perspective shifting, problem solving or reading / self education. These are designed to allow you to relate to worrisome issues more effectively and through a different set of lenses.

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Employee Engagement and EI (Latest Study)

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According to the latest study by Genos, global specialists in the development and education of Emotional Intelligence (EI), the following has emerged:

“Leaders who demonstrate high levels of EI in the workplace drive higher levels of employee engagement as evidenced by the individual engagement levels of their direct reports.”

To those familiar with EI this comes as no surprise. But for those who may have perceived EI to this point as a “nice to have” or “soft skills” this should represent a real developmental opportunity for all levels of leadership. In this study individuals were measured in terms of their own levels of engagement in three specific facets:

  • Praise the organization to others
  • Perform above and beyond what is expected of them
  • Persist in the face of adversity

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